Incorporating Wolverhampton Camera Club
Copyright © Wolverhampton Photographic Society 2017
Supported by the National Lottery
No image or design on this site may be copied or used in printed or digital form without permission and all photographs remain the property and copyright of the original photographer.
The Oscar G Rejlander Commemorative Blue Plaque
In 1988, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the foundation of Wolverhampton Photographic Society the Committee, led by the newly elected President Jim Dowdall, organised several public events. Interestingly, four current members of Wolverhampton Photographic Society were members of the 1988 committee – life members Gerry Treadwell and Gerald Hanrahan as well as John Holt and Mike Piper, who is still member of the WPS committee. (2017) The events they organised included a lecture by Dr. Heather Angel at the Wulfrun Hall in Wolverhampton, and an exhibition at the Wolverhampton Art Gallery of retrospective photographs. Wolverhampton Photographic Society also funded the erection of a plaque, by the Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Civic Society, to the memory of Oscar Rejlander. It was placed on the wall of an office block at 42-46 Darlington Street and was located as near as possible to the now demolished site of Rejlander’s studio at 42 Darlington Street, as shown in the photos. Oscar G Rejlander, “The Father of Art Photography”, lived in Wolverhampton for twenty years and it was in his studio he produced the world- famous composite photograph ‘The Two Ways of Life’.
The erection of the original commemorative plaque on the wall in Darlington Street in 1988
The building in lower Darlington Street, which housed Rejlander’s studio, was demolished in the mid-1960’s to make way for Wolverhampton’s ring road development. The monochrome photo shows the location of Rejlander’s studio prior to demolition, then being used as shops. Today, much of the space where these those buildings once stood is now Fold Street Car Park. New Buildings were erected on this site close to the Chapel Ash traffic island on Lower Darlington Street, with the first one being a brick-built suite of offices numbered 42-46 Darlington Street. This was then the closest building to the original site of Rejlander’s studio and in 1988 it was therefore the location chosen for the original blue commemorative plaque. Subsequently, believed to be in 2007, the plaque was removed by Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society for storage and safe keeping before the building upon which is was located was demolished. Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society kept the plaque in storage until it was needed for a major photographic exhibition. This was at the City’s art gallery from November 2013 to February 2014 and celebrated the 125th anniversary of Wolverhampton Photographic Society. Following additional research, more information about Rejlander’s time in Wolverhampton was discovered including that he first arrived in Wolverhampton in 1842, a few years earlier than had previously been thought. Accordingly, it was decided to erect a new and updated commemorative plaque and, together with the Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society, it was decided to mount it on a wall on the opposite side of Darlington Street as this was now the closest suitable location. The plaque was unveiled in a formal ceremony on 30th August 2016 and this is where you will find it today.
Although subsequently used for shops, this is where Rejlander’s studio was located prior to demolition in the mid-1960’s
The Mayor of Wolverhampton, Barry Findlay and the Lady Mayoress, with Wolverhampton Photographic Society members David Kingston (right) and Roy Hawthorne (left), with a replica of the new Rejlander Commemorative plaque. The actual plaque is mounted on the wall behind them. (2016)
The new blue plaque in honour of Oscar Rejlander which commemorates his pioneering work carried out at his studios at 42 Darlington Street, Wolverhampton. In this tiny studio he pioneered Art Photography and, in 1857, produced his famous composite photograph ‘The Two Ways of Life’
PHOTO: CHRIS NUTT PHOTO: JOHN HOLT
Fold Street car park in lower Darlington Street which now occupies the space where Rejlander’s studio was located
Incorporating Wolverhampton Camera Club
Copyright © Wolverhampton Photographic Society 2017
Supported by the National Lottery
No image or design on this site may be copied or used in printed form or digitally without permission and all photographs remain the property and copyright of the original photographer.
The Oscar G Rejlander Commemorative Blue Plaque
In 1988, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the foundation of Wolverhampton Photographic Society the Committee, led by the newly elected President Jim Dowdall, organised several public events. Interestingly, four current members of Wolverhampton Photographic Society were members of the 1988 committee – life members Gerry Treadwell and Gerald Hanrahan as well as John Holt and Mike Piper, who is still member of the WPS committee. (2017) The events they organised included a lecture by Dr. Heather Angel at the Wulfrun Hall in Wolverhampton, and an exhibition at the Wolverhampton Art Gallery of retrospective photographs. Wolverhampton Photographic Society also funded the erection of a plaque, by the Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Civic Society, to the memory of Oscar Rejlander. It was placed on the wall of an office block at 42-46 Darlington Street and was located as near as possible to the now demolished site of Rejlander’s studio at 42 Darlington Street, as shown in the photos. Oscar G Rejlander, “The Father of Art Photography”, lived in Wolverhampton for twenty years and it was in his studio he produced the world-famous composite photograph ‘The Two Ways of Life’.
The building in lower Darlington Street, which housed Rejlander’s studio, was demolished in the mid-1960’s to make way for Wolverhampton’s ring road development. The monochrome photo shows the location of Rejlander’s studio prior to demolition, then being used as shops. Today, much of the space where these those buildings once stood is now Fold Street Car Park. New Buildings were erected on this site close to the Chapel Ash traffic island on Lower Darlington Street, with the first one being a brick-built suite of offices numbered 42- 46 Darlington Street. This was then the closest building to the original site of Rejlander’s studio and in 1988 it was therefore the location chosen for the original blue commemorative plaque. Subsequently, believed to be in 2007, the plaque was removed by Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society for storage and safe keeping before the building upon which is was located was demolished. Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society kept the plaque in storage until it was needed for a major photographic exhibition. This was at the City’s art gallery from November 2013 to February 2014 and celebrated the 125th anniversary of Wolverhampton Photographic Society. Following additional research, more information about Rejlander’s time in Wolverhampton was discovered including that he first arrived in Wolverhampton in 1842, a few years earlier than had previously been thought. Accordingly, it was decided to erect a new and updated commemorative plaque and, together with the Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society, it was decided to mount it on a wall on the opposite side of Darlington Street as this was now the closest suitable location. The plaque was unveiled in a formal ceremony on 30th August 2016 and this is where you will find it today.
The erection of the original commemorative plaque on the wall in Darlington Street in 1988
Although subsequently used for shops, this is where Rejlander’s studio was located prior to demolition in the mid-1960’s
The Mayor of Wolverhampton, Barry Findlay and the Lady Mayoress, with Wolverhampton Photographic Society members David Kingston (right) and Roy Hawthorne (left), with a replica of the new Rejlander Commemorative plaque. The actual plaque is mounted on the wall behind them. (2016)
The new blue plaque in honour of Oscar Rejlander which commemorates his pioneering work carried out at his studios at 42 Darlington Street, Wolverhampton. In this tiny studio he pioneered Art Photography and, in 1857, produced his famous composite photograph ‘The Two Ways of Life’
PHOTO: CHRIS NUTT PHOTO: JOHN HOLT
Fold Street car park in lower Darlington Street which now occupies the space where Rejlander’s studio was located
Wolverhampton Photographic Society